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How To Safely Travel With Your Firearm to National Parks

national park guns

There are 59 wonderful and amazing National Parks in this blessed country. Since Yellowstone was established in 1872 the US Congress has established National Parks in 28 US states (Alaska has 8 of them). My family visited two National Parks this past week and I thought it would be an appropriate time to discuss how Gun Owners can safely and legally navigate to and through National Parks.

National Parks are operated by the National Park Service which is an agency of the Department of the Interior of the US Government.  On February 22nd, 2010 Congress approved a new law allowing loaded firearms in national parks. It was a provision inside of the Credit Card Accountability and Responsibility and Disclose Act of 2009 which was approved by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama. HOWEVER, don't stop reading here or you could get yourself into some serious trouble.

The devil is in the details as they say… so lets get started.

From the new law here is the relevant text:

Protecting the Right of Individuals To Bear arms in Units of the National Park System and the National Wildlife Refuge System—The Secretary of the Interior shall not promulgate or enforce any regulation that prohibits an individual from possessing a firearm including an assembled or functional firearm in any unit of the National Park System or the National Wildlife Refuge System if—(1) the individual is not otherwise prohibited by law from possessing the firearm; and (2) the possession of the firearm is in compliance with the law of the State in which the unit of the National Park System or the National Wildlife Refuge System is located.

What this then essentially does is apply state law to the possession of guns in National Parks. So, with that in mind here are considerations you need to study and be familiar with:

Individual States Can Prohibit Guns In Their National Parks

Since the new law essentially extends state firearm regulation into the National Parks located in that state you need to research state laws before traveling into a National Park. Since you likely have to drive through that state to get to the park, and because you are a responsible gun owner you know it is best to research gun laws in any state before you travel to or into that state. Add an extra step to check that state's regulations relative to having a firearm in a state or national park within that state. The Travelers Guide Book has a section on each state's page to answer that specific question.

Some Parks Cover Multiple States

If you are traveling to Yellowstone National Park for example, you may be in the boundaries of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho at one point or another. Be sure to be familiar with and in compliance with each state's laws in their respective state boundaries within the park.

Some Guns Could be Prohibited

The state may have regulation about what specific firearms may be allowed or legal including limitations on magazine capacity.

Concealed Carry Permit May Be Required

The state may require that you have a valid and recognized permit in order to have your firearm concealed on your person and/or in the vehicle.

Public Transportation Like Shuttle Buses, Ferries or Boats May be Prohibited

Riding or using public transportation within the park could be another thing that is prohibited within any given state.

Hunting is Illegal in Most National Parks Except Under Special Permits

Don't shoot at that deer. I like the meat as much as the next guy but the discharge of a firearm in a National Park is a big no-no and unless you have a special permit or license any form of hunting will be prosecuted.

Guns Cannot Be Carried Into Federal Buildings (And Their Parking Lots)

At Lake Lodge In Yellowstone National Park 2017

If you have researched all the above state specific nuances and are moving forward with carrying your gun into the park beware of the federally owned or operated buildings. Despite any other local law, Federal law continues to prohibit firearms inside of any federal building or any building at which federal employees operate full time. Within national parks most of the buildings would qualify and they only sometimes go to the effort of posting a sign. Also, an appellate court ruled in 2015 that gun owners do not have the right to keep/store firearms in their cars when on Federal property so even getting caught with your gun in your car in the parking lot of a Federal Building could be an issue.

Target Practice is Banned in National Parks

While it is lawful for gun owners to discharge firearms in National Forests, National Parks remain off limits to any sort of target practice or discharge of a firearm.

Other Weapons (Bows, Swords, & Airguns) Remain Prohibited

And lastly a reminder that while the law that went into effect in 2010 removed the firearm possession restriction it did not appeal or remove the restrictions in place on other forms of weapons. Take the Glock but leave the BB gun home.

If you want to freely travel the wonderful natural beauty of the United States you should consider having in your car with you a copy of “The Travelers Guide to The Firearm Laws of the Fifty States.” This simple but intuitive book will make it easy to research the various state specific laws that affect your travel plans!

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2 Responses to How To Safely Travel With Your Firearm to National Parks

  1. Jay June 24, 2017 at 10:55 pm #

    Well, hmm. So you’re allowed to carry in the park, but not in any building in the park or to have your gun in any parking lot. And you probably can’t have your gun in a bus, so you can’t park outside and take a bus in. You’d have to park your car somewhere outside the park’s boundaries and then walk in, and you can’t enter any buildings.

    Seems like in practice this means you still can’t carry in a national park.

    • Richard H. July 10, 2017 at 9:13 am #

      I believe you have got it right. What kind of crazy B.S. are the laws that entrap law abiding people like this.

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