Top Menu

Buying Ammo Online vs. In Store

ultimate-bullet-hd-pro_03

Ammo is obviously essential for your gun owner. Having a car is nice, and can be pretty to look at, but if you want to do anything with it, you’re going to need gas. And like gas, ammo can be a constant blip on your financial radar, because you always need to have more of it. So it makes sense to look for the cheapest and easiest avenues to get that.

In many instances, folks are turning to the ease of online shopping to get their ammo, while others are still going store to store and picking up the ammo they need as they need it. But which is better? Which is cheaper? Which is easier? That’s what we’re aiming to find out today.

ONLINE vs. IN-STORE COST

600

 

The local gun store, gun range, or even Wal-Mart might be the place that you are most familiar with and used to buying ammo. It’s a simple thing to just head out to the range and buy ammo when you’re going shooting or to add it to a random errand run at Wal-Mart, but this method, while bringing about instant gratification may be hurting your wallet. One of our ConcealedCarry.com readers Cameron B actually wrote to us some findings that he discovered regarding his experiences buying ammo from the store. He said…

This (Buying in store) is by far the easiest option, but some might argue the most expensive option.  I went to several stores in my local area and priced ammunition and, while overall prices were more expensive than ordering on-line, several retailers had offered sales prices that were very attractive.

Cameron also provided us with his findings on both online and in-store purchases down to the cost of each individual bullet in the chart that you can see below.

9mm, FMJ, lead core, 115 grain

Provider

Make

Rounds

Price

Per round

S&H

Per round

Total

AIM Surplus

CCI/Blazer Brass

1000

$199.00

$0.20

$14.75

$0.01

$0.21

Midway USA

CCI/Blazer Brass

1000

$259.99

$0.26

$17.49

$0.02

$0.28

Bulkammo

CCI/Blazer Brass

1000

$235.00

$0.24

$29.87

$0.03

$0.26

Cabela’s

CCI/Blazer Brass

1000

$279.80

$0.28

$18.95

$0.02

$0.30

Field & Stream

CCI/Blazer Brass

350

$119.00

$0.34

n/a

n/a

$0.34

WalMart

Remington

250

$68.92

$0.28

n/a

n/a

$0.28

So you can see that the cost is very close between Wal-Mart, which Cameron mentioned was the lowest he was finding and Midway USA, the most expensive online source. Another bit of information that the graph shows is that the number of rounds shipped is much higher than those received at Cabela’s or Wal-Mart. A plus to online buying is that shipping bulk ammo does not cost incrementally more, the more you buy. In fact, the cost per bullet may actually go down with the more you buy online, in several cases. However, there was one other issue which Cameron found that swayed the argument more firmly into a digital direction.

AVAILABILITY

bullets-cartridges-uhd-wallpapers

Now, you see that there is a slight edge for buying ammo online when it comes to pricing. The average can range between paying the same as you would in-store, to paying 13 cents more per round, however, the pricing is not the biggest issue that Cameron or we here at Concealed Carry have found. I’ll let Cameron’s words speak for themselves.

The biggest problem is availability.  Whether buying individual 50 boxes or buying bulk containers, all of the stores I went to had a limited amount available on the less expensive product.  Wal-Mart had the most inexpensive pricing, but also had the lowest amount of ammunition available.  The other potential negative is sales tax, and when you factor that in the price per unit may well be higher than what you can get online.

And there it is. Availability. Online stores are VERY RARELY going to run out of stock. because most places that are selling it are making it their priority. If they run out of inventory, they lose customers fast, because you can just check another website at the touch of a button. You don’t even have to get up out of your chair to give another store your business. So it is imperative that these companies keep the product flowing through. Whereas with Wal-Mart or Cabela’s, there are a lot of shipment steps for them to get stock in the first place, so you can pick it up in the store.

WORTH THE WAIT?

The one downside for those of us who are ordering online is the dreaded waiting period. Amazon’s drone program is still in its infancy and they aren’t going to be sending you bullets anytime soon. The wait for ammo may take several days, but that brings about a question that you have to ask yourself. Is waiting a few days for ammo worth the money that you will save in doing it?

One could posit that with the saved money from purchasing online, you could, in turn, buy more ammunition for the same price and keep a stockpile for yourself, only ordering when you are running low, therefore never running completely out. Does that mean that it is the way that you have to do it? No. But with the age of the internet and online shopping, that is the biggest question. What is more important, your money or your time? You will save money buying online, but, provided the stores have the stock, you will save time buying in-store.

, , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply