Secure Storage Requirements

Summary for Secure Storage Requirements

Alabama:   None
Alaska:   None
Arizona:   None
Arkansas:   None
California:   A person commits the crime of “criminal storage of a firearm in the third degree” if the person keeps any firearm within any premises and negligently stores or leaves a firearm in a location where the person knows, or reasonably should know, that a child is likely to gain access to the firearm without the permission of the child’s parent or legal guardian, unless reasonable action is taken by the person to secure the firearm against access by the child.
Colorado:   Firearms must be securely stored when one knows or reasonably should know that a juvenile can gain access to the firearm without the permission of their parent or guardian or when a resident of the premises is ineligible to possess a firearm.
Connecticut:   Firearms must be securely stored any time they are not in the owner's immediate control.
Delaware:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
District of Columbia:   Firearms must be securely stored when one knows or reasonably should know that a juvenile can gain access to the firearm without the permission of their parent or guardian or when a resident of the premises is ineligible to possess a firearm.
Florida:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
Georgia:   None
Hawaii:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
Idaho:   None
Illinois:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
Indiana:   None
Iowa:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
Kansas:   None
Kentucky:   None
Louisiana:   None
Maine:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor (under 16) gaining unauthorized access.
Maryland:   Firearms must be securely stored when one knows or reasonably should know that a juvenile can gain access to the firearm without the permission of their parent or guardian or when a resident of the premises is ineligible to possess a firearm.
Massachusetts:   Firearms must be securely stored any time they are not in the owner's immediate control.
Michigan:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
Minnesota:   Firearms must be securely stored when one knows or reasonably should know that a juvenile can gain access to the firearm without the permission of their parent or guardian or when a resident of the premises is ineligible to possess a firearm.
Mississippi:   None
Missouri:   None
Montana:   None
Nebraska:   None
Nevada:   Firearms must be securely stored when one knows or reasonably should know that a juvenile can gain access to the firearm without the permission of their parent or guardian or when a resident of the premises is ineligible to possess a firearm.
New Hampshire:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
New Jersey:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
New Mexico:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
New York:   Firearms must be securely stored when one knows or reasonably should know that a juvenile can gain access to the firearm without the permission of their parent or guardian or when a resident of the premises is ineligible to possess a firearm.
North Carolina:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
North Dakota:   None
Ohio:   None
Oklahoma:   None
Oregon:   Firearms must be securely stored any time they are not in the owner's immediate control.
Pennsylvania:   Firearms must be securely stored any time they are not in the owner's immediate control.
Rhode Island:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
South Carolina:   None
South Dakota:   None
Tennessee:   None
Texas:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
Utah:   None
Vermont:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
Virginia:   Firearms must be securely stored when one knows or reasonably should know that a juvenile (under 14) can gain access to the firearm without the permission of their parent or guardian or when a resident of the premises is ineligible to possess a firearm.
Washington:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor gaining unauthorized access.
West Virginia:   None
Wisconsin:   There are legal consequences if one fails to secure their firearm and that leads to a minor (under 14) gaining unauthorized access.
Wyoming:   None
Disclaimer:
While Concealed Carry Inc strives to maintain legal reference information updated on this website; you as the reader and gun owner are responsible to do any and all necessary research and consult with a local attorney before making any decisions. Concealed Carry Inc is not liable for any misinformation, inaccuracies, or actions taken based on this information. We are not attorneys and this information is not legal advice. If you see any information you feel is outdated or incorrect please contact us.

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